From Bullied to Business

It would be difficult to find a more referenced topic in the press today than bullying in some shape or form. From Donald Trump’s alleged bullying of his critics; to controversial internet-sensation videos such as the one this past week of 11-year-old Keaton Jones crying about bullies; to the “#MeToo” movement and the unmasking of past histories of sexual harassment; barely a day goes by when the topic is not in the press.

Share
Are You a Winner or a Champion?

Sometimes you read something that is so powerful, it can change the course of your life. That happened to me nearly 30 years ago. As an avid sports enthusiast, I soaked up everything I could read on sports. And in 1988 I came across a study, which was published in the iconic American publication Sports Illustrated, on what differentiated winners from champions.

Share
In Life, We are All Blind Mountain Climbers

Whenever the topic comes up regarding “inspirational people,” I always think first about one person: Erik Weihenmayer, the most inspirational individual I have ever met. You may have heard of Erik. He is a blind man, having gone totally blind by the age of 13 from a progressive disorder of the retina. Erik, however, never let blindness get in the way of living a full life. While he is a skier and marathon runner, among many pursuits, his real passion is mountain climbing. Erik became the first, and is still the only blind man to conquer the “7 Summits” — the tallest mountains on each continent. He is the only blind climber to have summited Mt. Everest.

Share
Be a Hero in Delivery, not in Promises

The country’s recent SEA Games debacle once again illustrated a cardinal rule of effective business management: “Be a hero in delivery, not in promises.” Or, said another way: “Deliver or over-deliver what you commit to; never, ever over-promise and under-deliver!” I’ve seen it so many times in a row it is hard to keep track. But once again, many of the sports leaders in the country failed to learn this fundamental lesson of any well-run business. Good leaders call out reality. They know their business. They put real numbers on the table and then deliver them. They don’t brag and put out unachievable figures, celebrate the braggadocio and then look like fools when they miss by a mile.

Share
Never Confuse Niceness with Weakness

Human nature can have its flaws. We sometimes project one thing on another when the linkage is all wrong. We see a wildly barking dog and we equate the bark with the bite. Very often, as we learn, it’s not the case. The bark is worse than the bite. Naturally, we equate tough talk with tough people. Again, not always the case. Donald Trump talks tough. But beyond the mere fact he can physically stand up, there is little evidence to suggest he has anything resembling a spine. From hanging on Daddy’s coattails to get his start in business; to dodging military service with the most questionable of excuses; to blaming others and refusing to have the strength to admit mistakes or take responsibility; the man is a poster boy for weakness. No, tough talk does not equate with tough people.

Share